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Showing posts from 2011

A New Focus for the New Year

I thought long and hard about what to do with this blog after spending yet another year essentially documenting my decline. As we age, our reasons for running change. Our bodies change too. My physical therapist last night told me that the older we get, the more we shift from being uber fit to just trying to stay flexible. It takes some people like me longer to transition, but I'm finally there. "Project Me" is still going strong, and running remains an important part of my grand plan to look and feel better when I turn 50 a few months from now. But I'm also going to return to this blog's roots and devote more posts to research I come across in my current profession. In this case, I'm going to write about the most important organ we engage when we run: the brain. I already do a lot of reading on cognitive science at work as it relates to Alzheimer's and dementia. But this upcoming year, I'm going to share more of what I learn because we could all

The Two Tornadoes

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That's what my husband calls our daughters when they visit. Whether it's a weekend or full week, as it was this time, they almost immediately destroy what was once tidy and manage to both remove and release items that we find for hours, even days, after they leave. After awhile, you just avoid looking in that direction. It's easier that way. This time they borrowed heavily from my closets, usually without permission. They also raided our cold weather gear for the Holiday Bowl, but that time I approved. I just discovered they emptied my entire sock drawer but they left a Costco-sized box of healthy-ish fruit rollups. Someone forgot to pack a nice pair of jeans, and we're still scratching our heads over how my tweezers ended up in the Christmas tree. All this we took in after one boarded a San Francisco-bound plane without a few of her presents, and the other was on her way to a Tahoe cabin via Disneyland and Davis with only one earring in a pair . . . and maybe my b

(Almost) Wordless Wednesday

My Favorite Things of 2011

Along with taking on a post-dawn mall with my prodigy in search of sales, we have another post-Christmas tradition here at Run DMZ. It's time to indulge in a little hubris and list some of the races, books, movies, plays and songs that I especially enjoyed this year. First, here's my list from 2010 . And now, on to this year. Favorite Race: Buffalo Alley 10k Once again, I didn't do a lot of races this year. But it never felt so good to hurt so bad as the 60 minutes I spent moving with a couple of thousand others through the hills of Camp Pendleton on a race-perfect October morning. I really enjoyed my video version too. Favorite Book: 2030: The Real Story of What Happens to America by Albert Brooks It's impossible to read this Swiftian satire and not start worrying about where we're heading as a country. It is a fictional account of the United States 20 years from now, when we've found a cure for cancer and Alzheimer's Disease and we've continued to

Yes, This is Someone's House

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Want an Injury? Sign Up for a Big Race.

I used to think it was just me. Then I started following a good many running bloggers and realized that I’m not the only one that seems to be struck by a significant injury soon before a big event. Here’s what I think happens. We invest a lot of hope and money into a big “A” race, or even a B race that sells out quickly, and we promise to follow the marathon or half marathon schedule to stay healthy. But maybe we get ambitious and ramp up the mileage ahead of schedule or start the schedule midway through without a proper base. Then, what starts as a niggling ache in our foot, ankle, shin, knee, quad, hamstring or hip becomes bona fide pain as we build up mileage. We realize this is maybe going to take more than a day or two off to heal. So we take ibuprofen and give it a week when we really need to give it two or three. But that long of a layoff could spell trouble so we “modify” our routine but continue to put undue pressure on our knees, hips, feet and thus make matters worse. Ins

Men

I'm about to make someone mad. I want to know why men can't follow directions. And don't give me that bit about how it's not nice to stereotype. Case in point: this morning's 5th annual Christmas Card Lane Fun Run. I used to direct this run, and I designed the 5-mile course. This is the fifth time at least half the field has done it, though only the second from this particular start and finish point. Everyone is supposed to look in advance at the course map and carry a copy if they need. This also was the first time I was a course marshal with my husband. When I gave him his simple marching orders ("Make sure they turn right at the corner where you're standing."), he looked at me incredulously. "You mean these people can't follow a map or go right when I tell them to go right?" Then he called me at my post after the first two runners - men - came through. "They just crossed the street for no reason after they passed me; I have no

Wordless Wednesday

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Falling for My Foam Roller

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I’m in love with my foam roller. Since I started physical therapy for greater trochanteric bursitis , I’ve been self-massaging with the Trigger Point foam roller I bought from a local running store. It is one of the best $40 investments I may have ever made in my personal health. I realize many runners already are familiar with foam rollers, but I didn’t realize what an important part of my running and rehab arsenal one was until I actually owned one -- and, importantly, used it. Now, each morning and evening I settle in to do my prescribed floor exercises and end with a hip roll session to work out the knots and scar tissue built up from a year’s worth of neglect. The orthopedist warned it would hurt like an SOB, and she wasn't wrong. I also use it to get the kinks out of my back and shoulders after hours sitting in front of a computer. And sometimes I relax at the end of a long day with roller-induced foot massages while watching my current favorite television show, “Revenge.”

Over the Moon

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I emailed my running/walking group to make sure everyone knew about this morning's total lunar eclipse. For those of us on the West Coast, we got a rare treat that won't be seen again until April 2014, and even then it might be obscured by clouds or occur in the middle of the night . This one began just before daybreak, and I wanted an unobstructed view of the northwestern skies. So I grabbed my camera, car keys and Mace and headed to Hilltop Community Park. Braced for hooligans, I instead encountered dozens of professional photographers, moon lovers, star gazers and dog walkers lining the rim of the park. Despite the hour, not one child cried and not one kid complained. My point-and-shoot camera was no match for the big guns on tripods. But I did manage to get a couple of decent shots. I also decided the lunar event was as good a reason as any to come out from behind my own shadow and start posting again. Feels good to be back at it.

The Silent Treatment

Run DMZ is going to go dark for the next several weeks. (And if I usually or even infrequently comment on your blog and it seems I haven't in awhile, it's not me. It's your blogging software telling me I'm not wanted.)

Sheriff's Department's Sweet Side

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Hold the Sunscreen

Now that I've raised everyone's social conscience about the true cost of our fresh food and other goods , I thought I'd focus on some of the benefits of those fruits, vegetables and another natural ingredient: the sun. A couple of weeks ago I attended a health conference and one session focused on treating the whole person through diet and exercise. Many of our "lifestyle diseases" such as type 2 diabetes come from poor choices and bad habits. I thought I knew it all, but here are some things I learned that surprised me. Vitamin D - Not as Easy to Get as You Think We all know that vitamin D is a key component of our everyday health, and that the best way to get it is from direct sun. (Vitamin D deficiencies have been linked to depression.) What you may not know is that if you wear sunscreen, you not only block potentially harmful rays but also the beneficial ones. Similarly, once you ingest vitamin D through the skin or the stomach (in food or pill form), yo

Wordless Wednesday

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Sunday Morning Snail Dodging

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After a succession of rainy weekends, I took one look at the blue peeking through the blinds early this morning and immediately threw on a pair of tights, technical shirt, shoes and the brand new Triple Trail Shell I received a week ago from Columbia Sportswear. Field testing winter gear when you live in San Diego is tricky, but the 48 degree air and chosen bike route were perfect to discern the colorful jacket's wind resistance and wickability. When it's warm, you live for the breezes on long downhills and dread the heat generated on the climbs. But when late fall and winter arrives, it's the reverse. The winds tear at your face, ears and limbs as you barrel down steep parts of bike paths; you start longing for a different discomfort from leg churn. Today was different, and I think it's because of this jacket. First: a disclosure. I immediately fell in love with this jacket before I even tried it on or read about the technology to keep you 20% warmer by reflecting b

What's Your Slavery Footprint?

I just came across an app that immediately intrigued me because it brings awareness to something way too often overlooked in this country. It's called The Slavery Footprint , and I found out about it this morning courtesy of this post . Living in California, and traveling regularly through the Central Valley where a bulk of everyone's U.S.-bred fruits and nuts are produced, I became keenly aware of how poorly farmhands are treated in this country. I even blogged about it several years ago . Some of us tend to feel morally superior because of the foods and lifestyle choices we make. After taking this "test," perhaps that piety will recede a bit. After you take it, you can share your score if you wish. Personally, I'm embarrassed by mine.

Wordless Wednesday

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What Really Gets You to the Finish?

For a change, this post isn't about me. It's about you. Laura V. is the author of a book and blog about productivity and also is a runner, the kind that apparently is fit enough to run through pregnancies and start up again within weeks of giving birth. One of her recent posts asks people to consider how they are motivated and uses marathons as a metaphor. Basically, she boils marathon training and race day strategy into two camps: those who prefer to turn inward and those that gravitate toward external sources to get them to the finish line as fast as they can. And a marathon is a great example because shorter races require a different strategy, but regardless of how well you plan to run a marathon, there are more variables. Even the elites blow it if the weather isn't right, their nutrition or hydration backfire or an injury flares up. So here's my question: Which is more important to you - being motivated by the clock or being motivated by other people? You can&

Less Wordy Wednesday

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Remember my friend Jessie that we all helped get out of Iceland for her honeymoon ? Well, she sent some pictures from her wedding ceremony and I wanted to share our favorite. I do not know the photographer and it's possible this may only stay up a few days. But I'd like to think part of Jessie's jubilation in this shot is because a lot of people she didn't know played a part in how she will begin her marriage. Thank you! Thank you!

She Was With Us Until She Wasn't

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The two Grand Dames, as we liked to call Maggy and Grandma . She was a class act, right to her very last breath at around 9:30 a.m. today. I've replayed the last couple of days and especially the last few hours over and over, wondering if there was something I missed or something more I could have done. The early morning walk, usually our longest of the day, was made shorter because she didn't seem in the mood. I wonder now if that last walk was more for me than for her. She ate a few bitefuls of her last breakfast, maybe to be polite. A little later she asked to go out the rear sliding glass door, but I couldn't let her loose in the condo like I could at the old house. So when she went too far, I quietly called her back and she listened to me, ignoring what her canine soul was instructing. She walked back into the house and laid down in her dog bed. I am so sorry for the way I broke the news to Louise and Rolly. I am so sorry that she couldn't die with her own

Food Allergies: Not So Fast

For decades I went through life believing I was allergic to Novocain, a common local anesthesia. As a result, I never was numbed when I had cavities filled or even an episiotomy during childbirth. (And epidurals? Forget it!) All because when I was 5 I fell off a see-saw and was knocked out. I remember the fall and next coming to as a doctor was stitching up my forehead. I was told my heart rate wasn't right after the injection and shouldn't take Novocain. That was in the 1960s, and I stuck with that story through a lot of painful procedures. Then this summer I went to a new dental practice for my first crown. Instead of taking my word, they conducted an allergy test because the formula had changed and - lo and behold - I wasn't allergic anymore. I now wonder if I ever was. This got me thinking about the sudden surge in food allergies and this article I read earlier in our local newspaper . It seems to buck against evolution that we're becoming less tolerant of our

Wordless Wednesday

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Race Review: Light the Night 5k

My friend Deborah described the Light the Night to Stop Crime 5k as more of an event than a race. After experiencing it last night, I tend to agree. The race starts at 7 p.m. by the old Naval Hospital in Balboa Park. You don't actually run through the park but alongside of it on Park Blvd. We arrived in plenty of time to find great parking, get our running numbers and glow sticks, check out the expo, use the portable toilets a time or two and, for a couple of people in our group, get first dibs on the taco plates that typically are a post-race meal. (They actually were smart -- and walking the course -- because the lines later would be really long for just about everything.) This race is under different management now, so we had chips to accurately record our times. That said, the start is chaotic as people with strollers, dogs, walking groups and lots of costumes cram as close to the start as they can. I felt disoriented initially, mainly because it was dark and crowded and I

Night Moves

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I was trying to think of the last true night race I did and best I could recall it was the annual Rockville Runfest 8k in Maryland that our family did for about four years in a row. Then we moved and that was all she wrote. Those that have followed our family can guess at how long ago this photo must have been taken (I'm in pink shorts), given the little girl with the number was in kindergarten and now she's a kindergarten teacher. And the one being carried by her dad is now 5'8". With night races, you don't have to worry about waking up on time, but you do typically hit more traffic. You must manage your fuel and your day differently. I remember this vividly from the Niantic Bay 10k my girlfriends and I did a few years ago in coastal Connecticut, but that began and ended in daylight. Tonight I'm again running after dark, this time at Balboa Park. It's a 5k to benefit San Diego Crimestoppers and it's kinda cool that our group is part of the San Die

Lots of 'Footage' from Camp Pendleton

Buffalo Alley 10k from Run DMZ on Vimeo . This was a lot of fun to compose. Enjoy.

Race Review: 2011 Buffalo Alley 10k

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When I say I was on the fence going into this morning's cross country 10k, I mean it literally. One minute I was on one side planning to run the 5k and the next I had hopped over to join the 10k runners with less than 2 minutes to go. I've got a fairly serious injury - bursitus of the hip - and that led to the decision to downgrade. But then I thought, What if this were my last race ... ever? Wouldn't I want to soak in every dusty footfall, every parched petal on the course? Wouldn't I want to at least say I didn't sell myself short? So there I was with 1200+ others hitting "the hill" just as the sun broke through the marine layer. As a result, I saw this challenging course in a whole new light. This one requires a high degree of concentration and stamina, but I decided to document the run in pictures and held onto my trusty Nikon so I could capture a little of what makes this final race in the Marine Corps' Hard Corps series so special. Because

Guest Wordless Wednesday

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Photo of Place des Vosges in Paris by Deborah J. Thanks!

Help Jessie Get Out of Iceland

Longtime readers of Run DMZ may recall my good friend Jessie, who served as confidant when we worked together and companion when we were "in transition" a year later . Jessie is getting married in two weeks, but not where she planned. About eight weeks before the date, she went to put down the required deposit for their dinner reception and learned this place had double booked and dropped their reservation. This also put the ceremony location in Quantico, Va., in jeopardy and, long story short, she cried hard, cried a lot, and then booked a harbor cruise for both ceremony and reception and at a very pretty penny. She's been super stressed since. Well before the wedding/reception went south (or, rather, north), she and her fiance Duke thought it might be fun to have friends and family choose their honeymoon destination. And Duke's friends thought it would be hilarious to send them to Iceland. So they voted en masse and Iceland pulled waaaaay ahead in the poll. Jessi

Advice for Life from Steve Jobs

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I may not be Apple's biggest fan, but I always admired Steve Jobs for his vision and for this speech he gave in 2005. And I'd always meant to post it on this blog, since I listen to it at least once a year. If you don't want to watch and listen, here's the transcript .

Wordless Wednesday

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Failure to Communicate

I read the other day that blog comments are down while less labor- and thought-intensive "likes" and "recommends" are up. A Pew study shows people 18 to 24 now text rather than talk 60% of the time, according to a radio report I cannot find online at the moment. Meanwhile, politicians and privacy advocates are urging the government to do something with the invasive policies of Facebook, which apparently tracks your online activity long after you sign out. My guess is 559.99 million of its 600 million users don't really care. I just tried to post comments to three blogs (all Blogger) and none were recorded. I have limited time as it is, so this is particularly frustrating. I don't "like" it one bit. But at least you wouldn't know I did it unless I told you here. Sometimes I'm glad to be behind the times and the technology.

Wordless Wednesday

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Sleepless in San Diego

On Friday I had to leave work early due to a migraine headache. It came as we were celebrating a co-worker's 40th birthday. One minute I was snapping photos for our Facebook Fan Page and the next I was lying on the carpet in an empty (and mercifully dark) room wondering when I'd again vomit and when I’d again feel the left side of my face. This one seemed to come out of nowhere until hours later, when I finally made it home and into my bed, I remember it had rained. That meant the barometric pressure had changed, and that’s the trigger. I ended up sleeping for almost 14 hours and woke ready to tackle the hill up to Lake Ramona via Blue Sky Preserve with my Saturday running group. It’s ideal training for a trail race coming up in a few weeks. And I felt surprisingly good for the ordeal I’d just been through. I think it was the sleep. Like the majority of Americans, I don’t get enough of it. And like a lot of people with sleep issues, I can so relate to this op-ed piece in th

Project Me

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Earlier I shared steps that I took over the summer to improve my overall health . Everyone reaches a stage in middle life where serious self-evaluation is needed. I do not begrudge my many years of running, but I do now see that my dedication has done some real damage. Here’s what I am doing now to try and make it up to me. Maybe you can learn from my mistakes. 1. Maintain a healthy weight. We all know our metabolisms slow as we age, though many don’t slow as much as we think. Instead, our appetites grow along with our income, especially once we hit our 40s. We also tend to have desk jobs by then because fieldwork is for younger folks. Now that I live in a much smaller home with very limited pantry space, it’s easier for me to not eat as much or as often. So if diets haven’t worked for you, consider the “scarcity” model and only stock, at most, a week’s worth of meals. And, of course, try not to eat too many empty calories in the name of carbo-loading. 2. Improve flexibility

Wordless Wednesday (a.k.a. Happy Feet)

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Wordless Wednesday

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The Powers That Be

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Our neighborhood at 9 p.m. I was in an afternoon meeting when the power went out. We've been having record heat, so everyone knew the grid was under duress. Then someone came in to say it wasn't a brownout but a blackout. Then someone else said it wasn't just San Diego but much of Southern California. Then the same person looked up from her smartphone and said it actually extended from New Mexico into Baja (the real Mexico). Then I knew I had to try and get home to my 97-year-old grandmother. Just imagine hundreds of thousands of people simultaneously pouring out of nearby buildings (if they weren't stuck in elevators or underground trolleys) and hitting the same narrow downtown streets and already clogged freeways when all of the traffic lights are out, gas stations are closed and ambulances are exiting hospitals en mass. That was my commute. The same situation played out everywhere in San Diego County yesterday as a power outage originating in Arizona created a

At Least Criminals are Colorful Here

Remember me saying that our new neighborhood was safe, given we had 24-hour security and the San Diego Police Station was right down the block? Well, this 7-Eleven is about a quarter mile from that police station too. Just in case the embedded video doesn't work: http://bcove.me/6sak6dh9

This Hits Too Close to Home

We were at our former home today (for the last time, I hope!) when I saw television trucks go by and discovered two teenagers were raped in the greenbelt just up the street. I must have slept through the helicopters immediately after it happened because everyone else seemed to know about it. It happened over the holiday weekend and around 8:15 p.m., when there were still people out and about and a party going on down the street. Heck, I've taken Maggy on walks at that hour in the exact same place and never felt unsafe. This is the same park I ran past every single morning (usually dark) for four years. It's also the same park where the first two Christmas Card Lane Fun Runs began and ended. Normally when police helicopters circle overhead, it's because of a brush fire in Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve or because someone on a skateboard just robbed a Wells Fargo branch (true story...he got away with it too). I haven't felt this vulnerable and angry since a woman run

Many Magic Erasers and Meltdowns Later...

I can’t recall a move this painful and protracted, but that may be because in the past all of our relocations have been to lateral or larger homes and therefore it was just a matter of making a few Goodwill runs, giving the old place a good scrub and then excitedly arranging new rooms. What didn’t immediately fit always could be stored in an attic, garage or basement. Until now. We halved the size of our living space and with that came a lot of soul-satisfying giveaways and weepy trips to trash bins. I did have one cheat, renting a 5x6 storage unit to keep some heirloom furniture and boxes of sentimental stuff because there’s only so much my maternal heart could handle. My husband and sister had long accused me of being a pack rat, which I’d always denied because our homes never looked cluttered. And yet when I hung up my sixth never-used robe, I had to admit they had a point. And when I counted my 12th – 12th! – blanket, I had to admit I had a problem. One closet and dres

Race Review: End of Summer Fire Run

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The "after" photo taken by Diane B, who also served as our chauffer this morning. Thanks, Diane!! I almost talked myself out of doing this race because (a) I was extremely busy,(b) I hadn't exercised in almost a week and (c) I wasn't feeling well. But I'm glad I didn't listen to that voice. I only wish I'd found the camera in our neverending move because today's 4-miler from La Jolla to Pacific Beach was picture-perfect. It's unusual for there to be clear skies along that stretch of coast that early. San Diegans are used to a thick marine layer until around 10 a.m. When it's lacking, it can only mean one thing: It's going to be a scorcher. And it was. But spending a Sunday morning with 1,800 others on a slightly downhill course was a perfect escape from my current stressful life. The run starts in downtown La Jolla and essentially winds down La Jolla Blvd. through Bird Rock and into Pacific Beach, where it ends at Garnet a

The 5:30 a.m. Run Test

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This is the view I see each morning as I head out for my early morning run. Or, more accurately, it's the view I used to see. We're moving again. Unlike past moves, we didn't have a compelling reason to stay in the same part of San Diego, which gave us plenty of options. Since this move represents a major downsize, I initially had my heart set on a downtown condo. Then one morning I picked up a friend at 5 a.m. at her downtown loft and, in addition to the vagrants, two young guys walking down the street saw me get out of my car and slid into a deep door frame. I can't prove they were waiting for me to walk by because I didn't give them the opportunity. Instead, I got back in my car, locked it and called my friend on my cell. I also checked downtown off the potential housing list that day. Then a lot of people recommended another trendy urban area not far from where I work. The problem, though, was that several blocks of neat bungalows always bumped up ag

Wordless Wednesday

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What's wrong with this picture/product?

A Dry Summer

This past weekend marked a turning point for me. I could drink alcohol again, but I didn’t. I devoted this summer to fixing some body parts that were no longer working as well as they used to. I guess this is what women do when they can’t afford to buy new models. Let’s go through this from head to toe, shall we? What a headache. I’ve suffered for several years now from migraines and gone through a battery of tests and slew of prescriptions to find out the root cause and best cure. The headaches were worst in the winter, when it rains here in San Diego, and I was convinced the wet soils produced some plant that made me sick. It turns out that the trigger is a change in the barometric pressure. And it also turns out that after many $$$ later, a bottle of Excedrin Migraine works just as well as those fancy drugs – and without the potent side effects. I can see clearly now.... Some people hate the dentist; I tense up at the optometrist’s office. I was overdue for an ey

Staying on Solid Ground

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Back when I was one of the cool kids, a group of us would meet after Tuesday track practices for dinner, usually pizza at Luigi’s in Golden Hill or Thai at Saffron off Washington Street. One of the guys was always planning a big hike with the goal of covering every bit of ground in a book he'd bought several years before. He mentioned that if I wanted to be a trail runner, then I had to own this book too because there was nothing else like it. He promised it would make me want to get into the wildnerness more often, and he was right. So I got a copy of that book and another with selections aimed at trail runners, both by a guy named Jerry Schad. To this day, they are the most opened and earmarked of all the books on my shelves. A community college professor by day, Schad wrote extensively of the most popular and the little known trails surrounding just about every open space in the county and beyond. Then today I found this article in our local paper about the author fightin

Wordless Wednesday

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From Smashburger to Smashrun

Last night we had the pleasure of joining friends Todd and Christine for a grand pre-opening of the newest Smashburger , now conveniently located in our suburb's "town center." Turns out Christine’s an elite Yelper and scored an invite. They had live entertainment and characteristically great food at this fast casual restaurant (now just feet away from a Golden Spoon … can it get any better? Wait, yes, it can – the food was FREE!) I highly recommend the San Diego Smash. And you must get the Smashfries too, tossed with rosemary and garlic. The grand opening reminded me I was recently introduced to a new online tool called Smashrun (no relation to the burger, I’m sure). It’s still in beta but for those seeking a “fresh start” in logging running miles, it may be just what you need. I asked someone at Smashrun to answer questions for me. Here are Jacklyn's responses as they were emailed: How does this program different from DailyMile and Athlinks, the two biggest pl

Down with Dvorak

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Technically it's still Wednesday, but I have been "off" all week thanks to major dental work and I thought Tuesday was Monday and today was Thursday despite everything pointing to it being Wednesday. Some weeks are just like that. To celebrate the middle of a pain-riddled and chaotic week, I raced across town to join friends for the annual Summerfest Under the Stars concert at La Jolla Cove. Let me tell you, nothing takes the edge off a stressful day like joining hundreds of others watching the sun set over the seas while the beautiful strains of Dvorak fill the salty air.

This Kiss Goes Out to Meg and Steve

I had the pleasure last night of dining with some old and some new running friends, all of whom are like me and can't keep their thoughts to themselves. Meg gathered a bunch of us while Jill and her son were in town. We'd hoped to toast the Denver pair's great adventure up Mt. Whitney; however, a nearby forest fire created conditions that made the asthmatic in the group abort before reaching the summit. Plus, poor Jill has been battling a serious injury for months now. It sounds like they had a good time anyway while in California. Meg and her husband Steve were hosts extraordinaire. They have a wonderful home and one of the nicest backyards I've seen. Now I know why Meg lists gardening among her hobbies. She's very good at it. And Steve was an excellent barbecue master, especially since we barbecued custom-made pizzas. (By the way, everything you might have ready about their adorable dog Daisy -- completely true!) It's always interesting to meet bloggers. I

When You Encounter an Exhibitionist...

You’re heading to take a shower in your gym’s highly humid locker room when you notice the only floor fan has been moved into one of the occupied stalls. No one’s running water. About 15 minutes later you emerge to now find the fan is aimed at a heavyset woman dressed in a floral blouse and black skirt. She’s lying on a long bench and she has her legs up. Did I mention she was wearing a skirt? You are one bench over and avert your eyes, then out of the corner notice her just staring into space. Occasionally she changes positions, but mainly she’s just staring and sharing her hoochie with the world, which at least is covered by underwear. Do you: a.) Continue to ignore her b.) Blow hot air at her butt. c.) Ask if she’s OK. Well, I did all three. First, I pretended there wasn’t a woman lying next to me in a strange position. Then I decided to test her by coyly aiming my blow dryer to elicit a response. Normally when it’s that humid, I don’t aggravate things by adding more heat to th

Running Topless in a 10k

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There are plenty of posts about running barefoot, but what if you're a woman who wants to run topless and in a big race that isn't Bay to Breakers ? A comedian shares her experience on an NPR program. Audio is about 5 minutes long. Have a listen.

Wordless Wednesday

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A Season of Hurt - and Healing

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If you live or visit San Diego and have frequented the 56 bikepath in the past couple of months, then you've seen the memorial erected after two cyclists were struck by an out-of-control SUV during the evening rush hour. One was killed instantly and the other, far as I know, survived life-threatening injuries. Here's another angle to help you understand how difficult it was for those of us who use this bikepath to fathom what happened. A motorist turned into oncoming traffic, overcorrected and ran her truck up a 15-foot steep embankment and through a large chainlink fence at precisely the time two executives were riding on the bikepath. They didn't know each other. It's been a solemn spot for cyclists since that fateful evening, and for some reason each time I pass it I start thinking about how many terrible drivers are out there (it's going to be one of our top public health crises in the next 20 years as aging baby boomers refuse to turn in their keys, fol