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Showing posts from December, 2009

Once in a Blue Moon

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If you were up and outdoors under clear skies before dawn this morning, then you witnessed a beautiful full moon. And if you're still up tonight celebrating the end of the decade, you'll see yet another full moon, much like the one on Dec. 2, which makes tonight's occurrence what we informally call a blue moon (though it isn't blue). It's a phenomenon that hasn't happened in about 20 years, and I think it bodes well for all of us, don't you? Cheers! 'Blue Moon' to Shine on New Year's Eve (National Geographic)

Wordless Wednesday

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5 Considerations For 2010 Running Goals

By now, just about everyone’s declared big plans for 2010. Here are five ways to help you succeed. 1. Pick a central theme, for your running and your life. It helps bring more meaning to your running if you have a central focus for the year, whether it’s trimming down finish times or smartly building mileage for a 100-miler. Since running is but one part of life, it only makes sense that the year’s overarching running goal sync with other expectations. For instance, if this is the year you want to be well respected within your running community, you’ll need to conduct yourself accordingly. You'll need to show, not tell. This is your personal brand that we’re talking about (and you have a brand whether you cultivate it or not). You can break down goals into semesters or seasons, but be sure both are consistent with what kind of runner you want to be a year from now. Remember too that cross-training is a must to avoid injury. In addition to running, create goals for cross-training

Count Your Blessings

Yesterday I was doing my holiday baking and one of my ingredients had gone bad. I rushed up to the Vons grocery store while the oven was still preheating, hoping to just run in and run out. On my way out, an attractive woman in her late 30s ringing the bell for the Salvation Army kettle was trying to hide her eyes from me. She was crying, hard. I asked if she was OK and she just said, "I hate when people make you cry." I figured someone had made some snide comment to her, given how bad things remain for many here. I also knew from seeing her several times now that she isn't bringing in much money, so maybe she was tired of so much rejection. I asked what happened and she said that a woman had just gone by and asked when her last day was. She said tomorrow (Christmas Eve) and burst out crying because she was going to miss the volunteer job and seeing now-familiar faces. The kettle-bell-ringing had been the only thing to pull her out of a deep depression after a string of

Wordless Wednesday

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One of the Most Amazing Things I've Seen

This is a 24-year-old Ukrainian woman, who's really "Got Talent," using sand to show what happened to her homeland when Germans invaded it during World War II. And be sure to click out of the annoying Google ad for the full effect.

My Moment in the Sun

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First folks started to hyperventilate when told to keep their technology at home for this run -- some defiantly telling me they refused to go “naked.” Then yesterday I drove up to the start and finish only to discover half of the park closed, as well as half of the parking spots. There would be nowhere else nearby to park, either. Not legally, anyway. All I needed now was for there to be unusually cold weather or, worse, rain. Instead, I’m happy to report that the 3rd Annual San Diego Track Club Christmas Card Lane Run was as good as it gets. People carpooled as I requested, so there were even spots for the locals using the park. The iPod and Garmin junkies made do. And the weather at the start was an unseasonable 60 degrees of full sun. Apparently this year I ranked much higher than I thought on Santa’s “Nice” list. I designed a new 5-mile course with Rancho Penasquitos’ Christmas Card Lane as the centerpiece. It had my hallmark hills, with the steepest the last .30 miles, but

Wordless Wednesday

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Hope on the Horizon

I got to see my insides, at least as they apply to my lower leg and -- yikes! -- it wasn’t pretty. All those bones and tendons sure make the foot and ankle look far more complicated. One slide in particular caught my attention, as well as the doctors’, and that’s the one with a significant tear on the upper portion of the achilles tendon. The good news is it’s only a partial tear. Had I not stopped running when I did on Halloween and beyond, I would have severed it by now. Instead, the continuous rest, ice and compression have helped, but there’s still a noticeable gap on the MRI screen. Surgery is the standard course of action for this injury; however, we’re going to give it another month of rest, ice, naproxen and, now, heating and specific stretches to see if the tendon can heal on its own. As with previous health care providers, we talked a bit about my running history and the M.D. and R.N., both former runners who didn’t quit when they were ahead, gave me hope that I will be a

Thank You, Bill

It took a random sighting on a dear friend's blog to prompt me to post before tomorrow's day of reckoning. That's when I'll get the final verdict on my foot injury after already receiving two other, confusing opinions. This time it's a sports medicine specialist with great credentials who is outside my HMO network. But back to folks who are within my network -- of friends, that is. A former colleague recently launched a very personal blog about his battle with OCD, and gave me a nice mention in a post on his work history. I know runners like to joke about their OCD-like tendencies with training, but after you read Bill's posts, you'll realize it's nothing to kid about -- and if you recognize yourself in what he says, please consider professional help. The OCD Diaries And speaking of Web sites, I wanted to note two running-related ones that vendors recently brought to my attention. The Clymb . This is a members-only price club on athletic gear that

A Cautionary Tale

Yesterday marked the anniversary of my last race. Exactly a year ago I ran one of my slowest 10ks and, having failed to notice no one around my age ahead of me, hurried off without my first-place age group award. In the months to come, I signed up well in advance for fast-selling races, only to be hobbled by injury. To save a spot and $5 on the registration fee, I’d blow five to ten times that amount to be a no-show at the start. By summer, I was still entertaining training schedules for a fall half marathon and a few 5ks, only to be sidelined again and again by injury – the same injury, acute achilles tendonitis. A familiar pattern continued to play out: I’d rest for weeks, start running on my own for short spurts, finally feel fine and rejoin a running group. Within weeks I’d re-injure my ankle. Looking back, I logged more (gas) miles volunteering to help my track club peers than I did running errands for the year. The final assault came during a Halloween morning trail run I was

Wordless Wednesday

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